A new bed for our big girl

We’ve had some big happenings around here this last week: my daughter moved from her crib to a big girl bed.  It wasn’t a change I was overly ready for.  But, I knew it was time.  While my child never climbed out of her crib, as toddlers can sometimes do, we did often have a power struggle over getting her out of the crib.  And by often, I mean pretty much every single time I got her up.  It went on for a few months this way.  I held my ground and reigned victorious in many such battles, but they were still battles that I was tired of fighting.

We decided the week between Christmas and New Years would be a good time since my husband was going to be working from home or off work.  The guy drives 70 miles one way to work, so just in case she kept us up throughout the night, we figured doing so when he wasn’t commuting was a good plan.

The kiddo getting up from her last nap in her crib.

She had one final nap time in her crib.  I didn’t think about it until we went in to get her up and my husband mentioned it.  I fled the room to get the camera and wipe the tears that blurred my vision.  I am a sentimental sap, and I am a mother. My baby is growing up.  Sigh.

My husband spent a few hours putting the bed together.  He then spent another hour putting together a storage unit for her toys.  We had been using her changing table shelves for storage, too.  But, it was also moving out.  The kiddo is potty trained now and only wears diapers for sleeping.  Plus her feet had been hanging over the end of the changing table for months, maybe even a year.

I organized her dresser drawers.  We purged some toys.  We packed away some clothes.  I made sure her new Minnie Mouse comforter and sheets were washed. I put the pillow case on her new pillow. We were ready.

The kiddo checking out her new bed. She was quite excited!

My parents had been hanging out with Lexiana while we were making the transition.  When she got home, we were excited to show her the new room just in time for a nap.  She was excited to see it.  We had talked about a big girl bed and she was ready.  Her first nap wasn’t a long one.  I’m not sure she slept all that much, but she stayed in bed and rested.  She found a dryer sheet in the sheets and pretended it was a blanket for her doll.  She did a good job.

That night, I was worried how things would go.  We did wake up around 5:30 a.m. with her pounding on her door (her bedroom door is directly across the hall from ours, so we close her door at night).  She had fallen out of bed.  She wasn’t hurt.  She just needed some snuggles.  Of course, she also locked her door by pushing in the button.  We got a small screwdriver and had the lock popped open within a couple of minutes.  A few snuggles and bathroom break later and she was back in bed asleep.  Since then she’s not fallen out of bed.  She’s slept well — and sometimes even better than she did in her crib.  We’ve talked about how everyone falls out of bed sometimes and it’s OK.  (I know.  You may be thinking that’s not true, but you’ve not met me.  I literally cracked a tooth falling out of bed a few years ago, so these things do happen to some of us way past the age of adjustment to a big girl bed.)  We’ve also talked about how she can sleep closer to the wall for even more safety.

The transition is now pretty much complete.  She loves to tell me when she wakes up in the morning that she will get herself up and I don’t need to do it.  She loves to show me how she can climb up into the bed on her own.  She loves to have us sit beside her for stories, prayer and songs at bed time.  She loves thinking of herself as a big girl.  She even stays in bed until I open her door to get her up from sleep time.

It’s a bit bittersweet that she is growing up.  Time really does fly, because it feels like just yesterday she was in a bassinet in our room.  But, here we are.  We are embracing the big girl bed with our big girl.  And I’m a proud mama for how well the transition has gone for her.

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